Why did Twitter ditch Favorites for Likes? The 3 Big Reasons

Earlier this month Twitter had people buzzing online, by and large on the platform itself, about the adoption of the like and heart to replace the favorite and star. Here are the three main reasons for the switch. To become more universal While it’s an easy assumption for some to make, equating the star to positivity with the “favorite” function isn’t necessarily known on the large scale. On the other hand, the heart is not only one of the oldest symbols on earth, it’s proven to work on other social media platforms. The heart symbol is one of the oldest icons in civilization, with origins traced back to the Ice Age. An international symbol, the heart was a staple of culture and religious practices in Ancient Egypt, Ancient Greeks, Romans and early Americans. Because of the symbol’s ability to transcend time, language and cultural barriers, it has become a universal sign for expressing positivity on social media. Using love and hearts in world-wide marketing is not new and Twitter is now catering to an audience beyond the United State. Twitter needed a change So far their change is working. Twitter has reported a 6 percent increase in Like activity after one week of switching to the hearts. This is trending in a much more favorable than their user growth, which prompted the move. Forbes has reported that U.S. user growth has been flat through 2015. While internationally their have been increasing user, some speculate it’s because of the use of Twitter as strictly a messaging system. Financially too, Twitter is a stock that is slumping worse than it ever has before. A year and a half removed from selling at more than $60 a share, TWTR is currently at $26.51. While many hope the stock can blow back up like Apple and Facebook, it’s still murky Conflicting purpose While the Favorite was unique to Twitter, its purpose was not clear. While some used it to save Tweets and others to show agreement or satisfaction, the like now provides clarity in purpose. Clicking the heart means liking the Tweet, and older, less tech-savvy users will adjust better drawing from familiarity of Facebook which has a like function. While the purpose is more defined there is no change to the function of the mechanism. Tweets that are liked are still saved in a tab like favorites were. So people who want to go through their like, or snoop through the likes of others, can still do so. Our poll on Twitter said only one respondent was using the function differently after the change. If the heart is changing how people use...

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Streaming Flourishes, but Cable Still Handcuffs Consumers
Nov11

Streaming Flourishes, but Cable Still Handcuffs Consumers

As the teeter totter of streaming and cable begins to even out, more and more devices are breaking through to make streaming easier for your television. Recently Apple just released the fourth generation Apple TV, with features everyone is talking about. The big one is the integration of siri functionality. Such as allowing Netflix users to search for movies and control features easier than ever before. Also, Apple TV introduces some new gaming features that incorporate the remote, doubling as a party-style game console. The games will run on a new operating system titled tvOS, the first time Apple TV will have native games. But it hasn’t been all positive reaction for Apple. Big criticism has come around for the manual search function on the Apple TV which is simply just a single, alphabetic bar at the top. Possibly a method to prong users to use Siri? If so, a bold strategy. Also, the new Apple TV isn’t just changing how users experience it, but app developers too. The new product makes it so designers must rely on retrieving data from iCloud for use. Polygon goes into much more detail, including the breakdown of app “slicing.” What really sets Apple TV apart from its competition is the way it is making TV dependent on Apps the same way our phones have become. It’s made others take notice. In fact, Amazon is now no longer carrying Apple TV or Google Chromecast on their store. Apple TV is just one of the many options that consumers have to stream on their TV. Roku, and “streaming sticks” like Chromecast and Amazon Fire TV Stick make it easy. But what about options that cut out the middle man and integrate the technology within the TV? SmartTVs. Samsung, Vizio and TCL are among just a few companies that provide an interface that allows you to stream without any other services, aside from an internet connection. Most of the Internet-ready TVs hover around the affordable range of $200 to $500. With TVs themselves making it this easy to stream, is the very device that was once two peas in a pod with cable contributing to its imminent extinction? Huge prices, unnecessary packages and commercials are just a few of the reasons viewers are ditching traditional TV viewing. But what about live TV? Without cable authentication, it can still be a challenge. WatchESPN requires a cable or Sling TV subscription. And CNN viewers who wish to watch coverage on an Apple TV also need a cable commitment. It’s the awkward middle ground many media find themselves, the struggle of not falling behind with streaming technology but not...

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